Implementing Session and Speaker Creation From Event Panel In Open Event Frontend

Open-Event Front-end uses Ember data for handling Open Event Orga API which abides by JSON API specs. It allows the user to manage the event using the event panel of that event. This panel lets us create or update sessions & speakers. Each speaker must be associated with a session, therefore we save the session before saving the speaker.
In this blog we will see how to Implement the session & speaker creation via event panel. Lets see how we implemented it?

Passing the session & speaker models to the form
On the session & speaker creation page we need to render the forms using the custom form API and create new speaker and session entity. We create a speaker object here and we pass in the relationships for event and the user to it, likewise we create the session object and pass the event relationship to it.

These objects along with form which contains all the fields of the custom form, tracks which is a list of all the tracks & sessionTypes which is a list of all the session types of the event is passed in the model.

return RSVP.hash({
  event : eventDetails,
  form  : eventDetails.query('customForms', {
    'page[size]' : 50,
    sort         : 'id'
  }),
  session: this.get('store').createRecord('session', {
    event: eventDetails
  }),
  speaker: this.get('store').createRecord('speaker', {
    event : eventDetails,
    user  : this.get('authManager.currentUser')
  }),
  tracks       : eventDetails.query('tracks', {}),
  sessionTypes : eventDetails.query('sessionTypes', {})
});

We bind the speaker & session object to the template which has contains the session-speaker component for form validation. The request is only made if the form gets validated.

Saving the data

In Open Event API each speaker must be associated with a session, i.e we must define a session relationship for the speaker. To accomplish this we first save the session into the server and once it has been successfully saved we pass the session as a relation to the speaker object.

this.get('model.session').save()
  .then(session => {
    let speaker = this.get('model.speaker');
    speaker.set('session', session);
    speaker.save()
      .then(() => {
        this.get('notify').success(this.l10n.t('Your session has been saved'));
        this.transitionToRoute('events.view.sessions', this.get('model.event.id'));
      });
  })

We save the objects using the save method. After the speakers and sessions are save successfully we notify the user by showing a success message via the notify service.

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.

Resources

Handling Data Requests in Open Event Organizer Android App

Open Event Organizer is a client side application of Open Event API Server created for event organizers and entry managers. The app maintains a local database and syncs it with the server when required. I will be talking about handling data requests in the app in this blog.

The app uses ReactiveX for all the background tasks including data accessing. When a user requests any data, there are two possible ways the app can perform. The one where app fetches the data directly from the local database maintained and another where it requests data from the server. The app has to decide one of the ways. In the Organizer app, AbstractObservableBuilder class takes care of this. The relevant code is:

final class AbstractObservableBuilder<T> {

   private final IUtilModel utilModel;
   private boolean reload;
   private Observable<T> diskObservable;
   private Observable<T> networkObservable;

   ...
   ...

   @NonNull
   private Callable<Observable<T>> getReloadCallable() {
       return () -> {
           if (reload)
               return Observable.empty();
           else
               return diskObservable
                   .doOnNext(item -> Timber.d("Loaded %s From Disk on Thread %s",
                       item.getClass(), Thread.currentThread().getName()));
       };
   }

   @NonNull
   private Observable<T> getConnectionObservable() {
       if (utilModel.isConnected())
           return networkObservable
               .doOnNext(item -> Timber.d("Loaded %s From Network on Thread %s",
                   item.getClass(), Thread.currentThread().getName()));
       else
           return Observable.error(new Throwable(Constants.NO_NETWORK));
   }

   @NonNull
   private <V> ObservableTransformer<V, V> applySchedulers() {
       return observable -> observable
           .subscribeOn(Schedulers.io())
           .observeOn(AndroidSchedulers.mainThread());
   }

   @NonNull
   public Observable<T> build() {
       if (diskObservable == null || networkObservable == null)
           throw new IllegalStateException("Network or Disk observable not provided");

       return Observable
               .defer(getReloadCallable())
               .switchIfEmpty(getConnectionObservable())
               .toList()
               .flatMap(items -> diskObservable.toList())
               .flattenAsObservable(items -> items)
               .compose(applySchedulers());
   }
}

 

DiskObservable is a data request to the local database and networkObservable is a data request to the server. The build function decides which one to use and returns a correct observable accordingly. The class object takes a boolean field reload which is used to decide which observable to subscribe. If reload is true, that means the user wants data from the server, hence networkObservable is returned to subscribe. Also switchIfEmpty in the build method checks whether the data fetched using diskObservable is empty, if found empty it switches the observable to the networkObservable to subscribe.

This class object is used for every data access in the app. For example, this is a code snippet of the gettEvents method in EventRepository class.

@Override
public Observable<Event> getEvents(boolean reload) {
   Observable<Event> diskObservable = Observable.defer(() ->
       databaseRepository.getAllItems(Event.class)
   );

   Observable<Event> networkObservable = Observable.defer(() ->
       eventService.getEvents(JWTUtils.getIdentity(getAuthorization()))
           ...
           ...
           .flatMapIterable(events -> events));

   return new AbstractObservableBuilder<Event>(utilModel)
       .reload(reload)
       .withDiskObservable(diskObservable)
       .withNetworkObservable(networkObservable)
       .build();
}

 

Links:
1. Documentation of ReactiveX API
2. Github repository link of RxJava – Reactive Extension for JVM

Open Event API Server: Implementing FAQ Types

In the Open Event Server, there was a long standing request of the users to enable the event organisers to create a FAQ section.

The API of the FAQ section was implemented subsequently. The FAQ API allowed the user to specify the following request schema

{
 "data": {
   "type": "faq",
   "relationships": {
     "event": {
       "data": {
         "type": "event",
         "id": "1"
       }
     }
   },
   "attributes": {
     "question": "Sample Question",
     "answer": "Sample Answer"
   }
 }
}

 

But, what if the user wanted to group certain questions under a specific category. There was no solution in the FAQ API for that. So a new API, FAQ-Types was created.

Why make a separate API for it?

Another question that arose while designing the FAQ-Types API was whether it was necessary to add a separate API for it or not. Consider that a type attribute was simply added to the FAQ API itself. It would mean the client would have to specify the type of the FAQ record every time a new record is being created for the same. This would mean trusting that the user will always enter the same spelling for questions falling under the same type. The user cannot be trusted on this front. Thus the separate API made sure that the types remain controlled and multiple entries for the same type are not there.

Helps in handling large number of records:

Another concern was what if there were a large number of FAQ records under the same FAQ-Type. Entering the type for each of those questions would be cumbersome for the user. The FAQ-Type would also overcome this problem

Following is the request schema for the FAQ-Types API

{
 "data": {
   "attributes": {
     "name": "abc"
   },
   "type": "faq-type",
   "relationships": {
     "event": {
       "data": {
         "id": "1",
         "type": "event"
       }
     }
   }
 }
}

 

Additionally:

  • FAQ to FAQ-type is a many to one relation.
  • A single FAQ can only belong to one Type
  • The FAQ-type relationship will be optional, if the user wants different sections, he/she can add it ,if not, it’s the user’s choice.

Related links

Discount Codes in Open Event Server

The Open Event System allows usage of discount codes with tickets and events. This blogpost describes what types of discount codes are present and what endpoints can be used to fetch and update details.

In Open Event API Server, each event can have two types of discount codes. One is ‘event’ discount code, while the other is ‘ticket’ discount code. As the name suggests, the event discount code is an event level discount code and the ticket discount code is ticket level.

Now each event can have only one ‘event’ discount code and is accessible only to the server admin. The Open Event server admin can create, view and update the ‘event’ discount code for an event. The event discount code followsDiscountCodeEvent Schema. This schema is inherited from the parent class DiscountCodeSchemaPublic. To save the unique discount code associated with an event, the event model’s discount_code_id field is used.

The ‘ticket’ discount is accessible by the event organizer and co-organizer. Each event can have any number of ‘ticket’ discount codes. This follows the DiscountCodeTicket schema, which is also inherited from the same base class ofDiscountCodeSchemaPublic. The use of the schema is decided based on the value of the field ‘used_for’ which can have the value either ‘events’ or ‘tickets’. Both the schemas have different relationships with events and marketer respectively.

We have the following endpoints for Discount Code events and tickets:
‘/events/<int:event_id>/discount-code’
‘/events/<int:event_id>/discount-codes’

The first endpoint is based on the DiscountCodeDetail class. It returns the detail of one discount code which in this case is the event discount code associated with the event.

The second endpoint is based on the DiscountCodeList class which returns a list of discount codes associated with an event. Note that this list also includes the ‘event’ discount code, apart from all the ticket discount codes.

class DiscountCodeFactory(factory.alchemy.SQLAlchemyModelFactory):
   class Meta:
       model = DiscountCode
       sqlalchemy_session = db.session
event_id = None
user = factory.RelatedFactory(UserFactory)
user_id = 1


Since each discount code belongs to an event(either directly or through the ticket), the factory for this has event as related factory, but to check for 
/events/<int:event_id>/discount-code endpoint we first need the event and then pass the discount code id to be 1 for dredd to check this. Hence, event is not included as a related factory, but added as a different object every time a discount code object is to be used.

@hooks.before("Discount Codes > Get Discount Code Detail of an Event > Get Discount Code Detail of an Event")
def event_discount_code_get_detail(transaction):
   """
   GET /events/1/discount-code
   :param transaction:
   :return:
   """
   with stash['app'].app_context():
       discount_code = DiscountCodeFactory()
       db.session.add(discount_code)
       db.session.commit()
       event = EventFactoryBasic(discount_code_id=1)
       db.session.add(event)
       db.session.commit()


The other tests and extended documentation can be found 
here.

References:

Open Event Server: Getting The Identity From The Expired JWT Token In Flask-JWT

The Open Event Server uses JWT based authentication, where JWT stands for JSON Web Token. JSON Web Tokens are an open industry standard RFC 7519 method for representing claims securely between two parties. [source: https://jwt.io/]

Flask-JWT is being used for the JWT-based authentication in the project. Flask-JWT makes it easy to use JWT based authentication in flask, while on its core it still used PyJWT.

To get the identity when a JWT token is present in the request’s Authentication header , the current_identity proxy of Flask-JWT can be used as follows:

@app.route('/example')
@jwt_required()
def example():
   return '%s' % current_identity

 

Note that it will only be set in the context of function decorated by jwt_required(). The problem with the current_identity proxy when using jwt_required is that the token has to be active, the identity of an expired token cannot be fetched by this function.

So why not write a function on our own to do the same. A JWT token is divided into three segments. JSON Web Tokens consist of three parts separated by dots (.), which are:

  • Header
  • Payload
  • Signature

The first step would be to get the payload, that can be done as follows:

token_second_segment = _default_request_handler().split('.')[1]

 

The payload obtained above would still be in form of JSON, it can be converted into a dict as follows:

payload = json.loads(token_second_segment.decode('base64'))

 

The identity can now be found in the payload as payload[‘identity’]. We can get the actual user from the paylaod as follows:

def jwt_identity(payload):
   """
   Jwt helper function
   :param payload:
   :return:
   """
   return User.query.get(payload['identity'])

 

Our final function will now be something like:

def get_identity():
   """
   To be used only if identity for expired tokens is required, otherwise use current_identity from flask_jwt
   :return:
   """
   token_second_segment = _default_request_handler().split('.')[1]
   missing_padding = len(token_second_segment) % 4
   payload = json.loads(token_second_segment.decode('base64'))
   user = jwt_identity(payload)
   return user

 

But after using this function for sometime, you will notice that for certain tokens, the system will raise an error saying that the JWT token is missing padding. The JWT payload is base64 encoded, and it requires the payload string to be a multiple of four. If the string is not a multiple of four, the remaining spaces can pe padded with extra =(equal to) signs. And since Python 2.7’s .decode doesn’t do that by default, we can accomplish that as follows:

missing_padding = len(token_second_segment) % 4

# ensures the string is correctly padded to be a multiple of 4
if missing_padding != 0:
   token_second_segment += b'=' * (4 - missing_padding)

 

Related links:

Creating Dynamic Forms Using Custom-Form API in Open Event Front-end

In Open Event Front-end allows the the event creators to customise the sessions & speakers forms which are implemented on the Orga server using custom-form API. While event creation the organiser can select the forms fields which will be placed in the speaker & session forms.

In this blog we will see how we created custom forms for sessions & speakers using the custom-form API. Lets see how we did it.

Retrieving all the form fields

Each event has custom form fields which can be enabled on the sessions-speakers page, where the organiser can include/exclude the fields for speakers & session forms which are used by the organiser and speakers.

return this.modelFor('events.view').query('customForms', {});

We pass return the result of the query to the new session route where we will create a form using the forms included in the event.

Creating form using custom form API

The model returns an array of all the fields related to the event, however we need to group them according to the type of the field i.e session & speaker. We use lodash groupBy.

allFields: computed('fields', function() {
  return groupBy(this.get('fields').toArray(), field => field.get('form'));
})

For session form we run a loop allFields.session which is an array of all the fields related to session form. We check if the field is included and render the field.

{{#each allFields.session as |field|}}
  {{#if field.isIncluded}}
    <div class="field">
      <label class="{{if field.isRequired 'required'}}" for="name">{{field.name}}</label>
      {{#if (or (eq field.type 'text') (eq field.type 'email'))}}
        {{#if field.isLongText}}
          {{widgets/forms/rich-text-editor textareaId=(if field.isRequired (concat 'session_' field.fieldIdentifier '_required'))}}
        {{else}}
          {{input type=field.type id=(if field.isRequired (concat 'session_' field.fieldIdentifier '_required'))}}
        {{/if}}
      {{/if}}
    </div>
  {{/if}}
{{/each}}

We also use a unique id for all the fields for form validation. If the field is required we create a unique id as `session_fieldName_required` for which we add a validation in the session-speaker-form component. We also use different components for different types of fields eg. for a long text field we make use of the rich-text-editor component.

Thank you for reading the blog, you can check the source code for the example here.

Resources

Implementing Order Statistics API on Tickets Route in Open Event Frontend

The order statistics API endpoints are used to display the statistics related to tickets, orders, and sales. It contains the details about the total number of orders, the total number of tickets sold and the amount of the sales. It also gives the detailed information about the pending, expired, placed and completed orders, tickets, and sales.

This article will illustrate how the order statistics can be displayed using the Order Statistics API in Open Event Frontend. The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for statistics is

GET /v1/events/{event_identifier}/order-statistics

First, we need to create a model for the order statistics, which will have the fields corresponding to the API, so we proceed with the ember CLI command:

ember g model order-statistics-tickets

Next, we need to define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class. The code for the model looks like this:

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
  orders  : attr(),
  tickets : attr(),
  sales   : attr()
});

As we need to display the statistics related to orders, tickets, and sales so we have their respective variables inside the model which will fetch and store the details from the API.

Now, after creating a model, we need to make an API call to get the details. This can be done using the following:

return this.modelFor('events.view').query('orderStatistics', {});

Since the tickets route is nested inside the event.view route so, first we are getting the model for event.view route and then we’re querying order statistics from the model.

The complete code can be seen here.

Now, we need to call the model inside the template file to display the details. To fetch the total orders we can write like this

{{model.orders.total}}

 

In a similar way, the total sales can be displayed like this.

{{model.sales.total}}

 

And total tickets can be displayed like this

{{model.tickets.total}}

 

If we want to fetch other details like the pending sales or completed orders then the only thing we need to replace is the total attribute. In place of total, we can add any other attribute depending on the requirement. The complete code of the template can be seen here.

The UI for the order statistics on the tickets route looks like this.

Fig. 1: The user interface for displaying the statistics

The complete source code can be seen here.

Resources:

Implementing Pages API in Open Event Frontend

The pages endpoints are used to create static pages which such as about page or any other page that doesn’t need to be updated frequently and only a specific content is to be shown. This article will illustrate how the pages can be added or removed from the /admin/content/pages route using the pages API in Open Event Frontend. The primary end point of Open Event API with which we are concerned with for pages is

GET /v1/pages

First, we need to create a model for the pages, which will have the fields corresponding to the API, so we proceed with the ember CLI command:

ember g model page

Next, we need to define the model according to the requirements. The model needs to extend the base model class. The code for the page model looks like this:

import attr from 'ember-data/attr';
import ModelBase from 'open-event-frontend/models/base';

export default ModelBase.extend({
  name        : attr('string'),
  title       : attr('string'),
  url         : attr('string'),
  description : attr('string'),
  language    : attr('string'),
  index       : attr('number', { defaultValue: 0 }),
  place       : attr('string')
});

As the page will have name, title, url which will tell the URL of the page, the language, the description, index and the place of the page where it has to be which can be either a footer or an event.

The complete code for the model can be seen here.

Now, after creating a model, we need to make an API call to get and post the pages created. This can be done using the following:

return this.get('store').findAll('page');

The above line will check the store and find all the pages which have been cached in and if there is no record found then it will make an API call and cache the records in the store so that when called it can return it immediately.

Since in the case of pages we have multiple options like creating a new page, updating a new page, deleting an existing page etc. For creating and updating the page we have a form which has the fields required by the API to create the page.  The UI of the form looks like this.

Fig. 1: The user interface of the form used to create the page.

Fig. 2: The user interface of the form used to update and delete the already existing page

The code for the above form can be seen here.

Now, if we click the items which are present in the sidebar on the left, it enables us to edit and update the page by displaying the information stored in the form and then the details be later updated on the server by clicking the Update button. If we want to delete the form we can do so using the delete button which first shows a pop up to confirm whether we actually want to delete it or not. The code for displaying the delete confirmation pop up looks like this.

<button class="ui red button" 
{{action (confirm (t 'Are you sure you would like to delete this page?') (action 'deletePage' data))}}>
{{t 'Delete'}}</button>

 

The code to delete the page looks like this

deletePage(data) {
    if (!this.get('isCreate')) {
      data.destroyRecord();
      this.set('isFormOpen', false);
    }
  }

In the above piece of code, we’re checking whether the form is in create mode or update mode and if it’s in create mode then we can destroy the record and then close the form.

The UI for the pop up looks like this.

Fig.3: The user interface for delete confirmation pop up

The code for the entire process of page creation to deletion can be checked here

To conclude, this is how we efficiently do the process of page creation, updating and deletion using the Open-Event-Orga pages API  ensuring that there is no unnecessary API call to fetch the data and no code duplication.

Resources:

Adding Number of Sessions Label in Open Event Android App

The Open Event Android project has a fragment for showing tracks of the event. The Tracks Fragment shows the list of all the Tracks with title and TextDrawable. But currently it is not showing how many sessions particular track has. Adding TextView with rounded corner and colored background showing number of sessions for track gives great UI. In this post I explain how to add TextView with rounded corner and how to use Plurals in Android.

1. Create Drawable for background

Firstly create track_rounded_corner.xml Shape Drawable which will be used as a background of the TextView. The <shape> element must be the root element of Shape drawable. The android:shape attribute defines the type of the shape. It can be rectangle, ring, oval, line. In our case we will use rectangle.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<shape xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:shape="rectangle">

    <corners android:radius="360dp" />

    <padding
        android:bottom="2dp"
        android:left="8dp"
        android:right="8dp"
        android:top="2dp" />
</shape>

 

Here the <corners> element creates rounded corners for the shape with the specified value of radius attribute. This tag is only applied when the shape is a rectangle. The <padding> element adds padding to the containing view. You can modify the value of the padding as per your need. You can feel shape with appropriate color using <solid> as we are setting color dynamically we will not set color here.

2. Add TextView and set Drawable

Now add TextView in the track list item which will contain number of sessions text. Set  track_rounded_corner.xml drawable we created before as background of this TextView using background attribute.

<TextView
        android:id="@+id/no_of_sessions"
        android:layout_width="wrap_content"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:background="@drawable/track_rounded_corner"
        android:textColor="@color/white"
        android:textSize="@dimen/text_size_small"/>

 

Set color and text size according to your need. Here don’t add padding in the TextView because we have already added padding in the Drawable. Adding padding in the TextView will override the value specified in the drawable.

3.  Create TextView object in ViewHolder

Now create TextView object noOfSessions and bind it with R.id.no_of_sessions using ButterKnife.bind() method.

public class TrackViewHolder extends RecyclerView.ViewHolder {
    ...

    @BindView(R.id.no_of_sessions)
    TextView noOfSessions;

    private Track track;

    public TrackViewHolder(View itemView, Context context) {
        super(itemView);
        ButterKnife.bind(this, itemView);

    public void bindTrack(Track track) {
        this.track = track;
        ...
    }   
}

 

Here TrackViewHolder is a RecycleriewHolder for the TracksListAdapter. The bindTrack() method of this view holder is used to bind Track with ViewHolder.

4.  Add Quantity Strings (Plurals) for Sessions

Now we want to set the value of TextView. Here if the number of sessions of the track is zero or more than one then we need to set text  “0 sessions” or “2 sessions”. If the track has only one session than we need to set text “1 session” to make text meaningful. In android we have Quantity Strings which can be used to make this task easy.

<resources>
    <!--Quantity Strings(Plurals) for sessions-->
    <plurals name="sessions">
        <item quantity="zero">No sessions</item>
        <item quantity="one">1 session</item>
        <item quantity="other">%d sessions</item>
    </plurals>
</resources>

 

Using this plurals resource we can get appropriate string for specified quantity like “zero”, “one” and  “other” will return “No sessions”, “1 session”, and “2 sessions”. accordingly. 2 can be any value other than 0 and 1.

Now let’s set background color and test for the text view.

int trackColor = Color.parseColor(track.getColor());
int sessions = track.getSessions().size();

noOfSessions.getBackground().setColorFilter(trackColor, PorterDuff.Mode.SRC_ATOP);
noOfSessions.setText(context.getResources().getQuantityString(R.plurals.sessions,
                sessions, sessions));

 

Here we are setting background color of textview using getbackground().setColorFilter() method. To set appropriate text we are using getQuantityString() method which takes plural resource and quantity(in our case no of sessions) as parameters.

Now we are all set. Run the app it will look like this.

Conclusion

Adding TextView with rounded corner and colored background in the App gives great UI and UX. To know more about Rounded corner TextView and Quantity Strings follow the links given below.

Using ThreeTenABP for Time Zone Handling in Open Event Android

The Open Event Android project helps event organizers to organize the event and generate Apps (apk format) for their events/conferences by providing API endpoint or zip generated using Open Event server. For any Event App it is very important that it handles time zone properly. In Open Event Android App there is an option to change time zone setting. The user can view date and time of the event and sessions in Event Timezone and Local time zone in the App. ThreeTenABP provides a backport of the Java SE 8 date-time classes to Java SE 6 and 7. In this blog post I explain how to use ThreeTenABP for time zone handling in Android.

Add dependency

To use ThreeTenABP in your application you have to add the dependency in your app module’s build.gradle file.

dependencies {
      compile    'com.jakewharton.threetenabp:threetenabp:1.0.5'
      testCompile   'org.threeten:threetenbp:1.3.6'
}

Initialize ThreeTenABP

Now in the onCreate() method of the Application class initialize ThreeTenABP.

AndroidThreeTen.init(this);

Create getZoneId() method

Firstly create getZoneId() method which will return ZoneId according to user preference. This method will be used for formatting and parsing dates Here showLocal is user preference. If showLocal is true then this function will return Default local ZoneId otherwise ZoneId of the Event.

private static ZoneId geZoneId() {
        if (showLocal || Utils.isEmpty(getEventTimeZone()))
            return ZoneId.systemDefault();
        else
            return ZoneId.of(getEventTimeZone());
}

Here  getEventTimeZone() method returns time zone string of the Event.

ThreeTenABP has mainly two classes representing date and time both.

  • ZonedDateTime : ‘2011-12-03T10:15:30+01:00[Europe/Paris]’
  • LocalDateTime : ‘2011-12-03T10:15:30’

ZonedDateTime contains timezone information at the end. LocalDateTime doesn’t contain timezone.

Create method for parsing and formating

Now create getDate() method which will take isoDateString and will return ZonedDateTime object.

public static ZonedDateTime getDate(@NonNull String isoDateString) {
        return ZonedDateTime.parse(isoDateString).withZoneSameInstant(getZoneId());;
}

 

Create formatDate() method which takes two arguments first is format string and second is isoDateString. This method will return a formatted string.

public static String formatDate(@NonNull String format, @NonNull String isoDateString) {
        return DateTimeFormatter.ofPattern(format).format(getDate(isoDateString));
}

Use methods

Now we are ready to format and parse isoDateString. Let’s take an example. Let “2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00” is isoDateString. We can parse this isoDateString using getDate() method which will return ZonedDateTime object.

Parsing:

String isoDateString = "2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00";

DateConverter.setEventTimeZone("Asia/Singapore");
DateConverter.setShowLocalTime(false);
ZonedDateTime dateInEventTimeZone = DateConverter.getDate(isoDateString);

dateInEventTimeZone.toString();  //2017-11-09T23:08:56+08:00[Asia/Singapore]


TimeZone.setDefault(TimeZone.getDefault());
DateConverter.setShowLocalTime(true);
ZonedDateTime dateInLocalTimeZone = DateConverter.getDate(dateInLocalTimeZone);

dateInLocalTimeZone.toString();  //2017-11-09T20:38:56+05:30[Asia/Kolkata]

 

Formatting:

String date = "2017-03-17T14:00:00+08:00";
String formattedString = formatDate("dd MM YYYY hh:mm:ss a", date));

formattedString // "17 03 2017 02:00:00 PM"

Conclusion

As you can see, ThreeTenABP makes Time Zone handling so easy. It has also support for default formatters and methods. To learn more about ThreeTenABP follow the links given below.