Structure of Open Event Frontend

In Open Event Frontend, new contributors always fall into a dilemma of identifying the proper files where they have to make changes if they want to contribute. The project structure is quite complex and which is obvious because it is a large project. So, in this blog, we will walk through the structure of Open Event Frontend.

Following are the different folders of the project explained:

Root:
The root of the project contains folders like app, config, kubernetes, tests, scripts. Our main project is in the app folder where all the files are present. The config folder in the root has files related to the deployment of the app in development, production, etc. It also has the environment setup such as host, api keys, etc. Other files such as package.json, bower.json, etc are basically to store the current versions of the packages and to ease the installation of the project.

App:
The app folder has all the files and is mainly classified into the following folder:
adapters
components
controllers
helpers
Initializers
mixins
models
routes
serializers
services
styles
templates
transforms
utils

The folders with their significance are listed below:

Adapters: This folder contains the files for building URLs for our endpoints. Sometimes it happens to have a somewhat customised URL for an endpoint which we pass through adapter to modify it.
Components: This folder contains different components which we reuse in our app. For example, the image uploader component can be used at multiple places in our app, so we keep such elements in our components. This folder basically contains the js files of all the components(since when we generate a component, a js file and a hbs template is generated).
Controllers: This folder contains the controller associated with each route. Since the main principle of ember js is DDAU i.e data down actions up, all the actions are written in the files of this folder.
Helpers: Many a time it happens that, we want to format date, time, encode URL etc. There are some predefined helpers but sometimes custom helpers are also needed. All of them have been written in helpers folder.
Initializers: This folder has a file for now called ‘blanket.js’ which basically injects the services into our routes, components. So if you want to write any service and want to inject it into routes/components, it should go in here.
Mixins: In EmberJS the Mixin class can create objects whose properties and functions can be shared amongst other classes and instances. This allows for an easy way to share behavior between objects as well as design objects that may need multiple inheritance. All of them used for the application are in the mixins folder.
Models: This folder contains the schema’s for our data. Since we are using ember data, we need to have proper skeleton of the data. All of this goes it this folder. Observing this folder will show you some models like user, event, etc.
Routes: This folder contains the js files of the routes created. Routes handle which template to render and what to return from the model, etc.
Serializers: We use serializers to modify the data that ember sends automatically in a request. Consider we want to get a user with the help of user model, and don’t want to get the password attribute present in it. We can thus omit that by defining it in a serializer.
Services: Services are the ember objects which are available throughout the running time of the application. These are used to perform tasks like getting current user model, making third party API calls etc. All such services go in this folder.
Styles: As the name infers, all the style sheets go in here.
Templates: A template is generated with generation of each route and component. All of them go here. Thus, the markup will be written over here.
Transforms: Ember Data has a feature called transforms that allow you to transform values before they are set on a model or sent back to the server. In our case, we have a transform called moment.
Utils: This folder contains some functions exported as modules which are reusable. There is some JSON data as well.

References: Ember JS official guide: https://guides.emberjs.com/v2.17.0/
Blog posts: https://spin.atomicobject.com/2015/09/17/ember-js-clean/
http://www.programwitherik.com/ember-pods/

Creating nested routes in Open Event Front-end and Navigating them with Tabs via semantic UI – Ember Integration

Semantic UI is a modern development framework which helps build responsive and aesthetically beautiful layouts. While it is a really powerful framework in itself, it additionally offers seamless integrations with some of the other open source frameworks including ember js.

Open Event Front-end is a project of FOSSASIA organisation, which was created with the aim of decoupling the front end and the back end for the open event orga server. It is primarily based on ember JS and uses semantic UI for it’s UI.

Here we will be making a nested route /events/ with /events/live/, events/draft, events/past , events/import as it’s subroutes.

To get started with it, we simply use the ember CLI to generate the routes

$ ember generate route events

Then we go on to generate the successive sub routes as follows

$ ember generate route events/live
$ ember generate route events/past
$ ember generate route events/draft
$ ember generate route events/import

The router.js file should be looking like this now.

this.route('events', function() {
    this.route('live');
    this.route('draft');
    this.route('past');
    this.route('import');
  });

This means that our routes and sub routes are in place. Since we used the ember CLI to generate these routes, the template files for them would have generated automatically. Now these routes exist and we need to write the data in the templates of these routes which will get displayed to the end user.

Since the routes are nested, the content of the parent route can be made available to all the children routes via the outlet in ember js.

Next, we go to the template file of events/ route which is at templates/events.hbs And write the following code to create a menu and use ember integration of semantic UI link-to to link the tabs of the menu with the corresponding correct route. It will take care of selecting the appropriate data for the corresponding route and display it in the correct tab via the outlet

<.div class="row">
  <.div class="sixteen wide column">
    <.div class="ui fluid pointing secondary menu">
      {{#link-to 'events.live' class='item'}}
        {{t 'Live'}}
      {{/link-to}}
      {{#link-to 'events.draft' class='item'}}
        {{t 'Draft'}}
      {{/link-to}}
      {{#link-to 'events.past' class='item'}}
        {{t 'Past'}}
      {{/link-to}}
      {{#link-to 'events.import' class='item'}}
        {{t 'Import'}}
      {{/link-to}}
    <./div>
  <./div>
<./div>
<.div class="ui segment">
  {{outlet}}
<./div>

So finally, we start filling in the data for each of these routes. Let’s fill some dummy data at templates/events/live.hbs

<.div class="row">
  <.div class="sixteen wide column">
    <.table class="ui tablet stackable very basic table">
      <.thead>
        <.tr>
          <.th>{{t 'Name'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Date'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Roles'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Sessions'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Speakers'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Tickets'}}<./th>
          <.th>{{t 'Public URL'}}<./th>
          <.th><./th>
        <./tr>
      <./thead>
      <.tbody>
        <.tr>
          <.td>
            <.div class="ui header weight-400">
              <.img src="http://placehold.it/200x200" alt="Event logo" class="ui image">
              Sample Event
            <./div>
          <./td>
          <.td>
            March 18, 2016 - 09:30 AM
            <.br>(to)<.br>
            March 20, 2016 - 05:30 PM
          <./td>
          <.td>
            <.div class="ui ordered list">
              <.div class="item">sample@gmail.com ({{t 'Organizer'}})<./div>
              <.div class="item">sample2@gmail.com ({{t 'Manager'}})<./div>
            <./div>
          <./td>
          <.td>
            <.div class="ui list">
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Drafts'}}: 0<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Submitted'}}: 0<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Accepted'}}: 0<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Confirmed'}}: 0<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Pending'}}: 0<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Rejected'}}: 0<./div>
            <./div>
          <./td>
          <.td>
            2
          <./td>
          <.td>
            <.div class="ui bulleted list">
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Premium'}} (12/100)<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'VIP'}} (10/15)<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Normal'}} (100/200)<./div>
              <.div class="item">{{t 'Free'}} (100/500)<./div>
            <./div>
          <./td>
          <.td>
            <.div class="ui link list">
              <.a class="item" target="_blank" rel="noopener" href="http://nextgen.eventyay.com/e/ecc2001a">
                http://nextgen.eventyay.com/e/ecc2001a
              <./a>
            <./div>
          <./td>
          <.td class="center aligned">
            <.div class="ui vertical compact basic buttons">
              {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Edit event details') class='ui icon button'}}
                <.i class="edit icon"><./i>
              {{/ui-popup}}
              {{#ui-popup content=(t 'View event details') class='ui icon button'}}
                <.i class="unhide icon"><./i>
              {{/ui-popup}}
              {{#ui-popup content=(t 'Delete event') class='ui icon button'}}
                <.i class="trash outline icon"><./i>
              {{/ui-popup}}
            <./div>
          <./td>
        <./tr>
      <./tbody>
    <./table>
  <./div>
<./div>

 Similarly we can fill the required data for each of the routes.And this is it, our nested route is ready. Here is a screenshot what you might expect.

Screenshot highlighting the tabs

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